Book Review: “Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class” by Scott Timberg

Book Review: “Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class” by Scott Timberg

This review was provided by the amazing Dave McNamara. Dave has a BA in Literature and MFA’s in both Acting and Creative Writing/Poetry. Find him on LinkedIn and Facebook. He’s there … lurking.   Scott Timberg makes a compelling case in this book that the so-called “Creative Class,” as made popular by the sociologist Richard Florida, is, if not a dying breed, currently suffering terribly. At first I thought the book would have a bit of the “preaching-to-the-choir” vibe after his well-written, yet clearly one-sided Introduction, but as the book gained momentum, the statistics he garnered to back his claim were compelling. Work for performing artists, creative writers, journalists, and others, is scarce, and continues to be so. Unless you’re a “trust fund baby” in America, it does seem the “creative class” is still reeling. And dying. Timberg gives various reasons why this is so. I won’t go into them in-depth, here. However, the thrust of his thesis seems to be this: the fall is a conglomeration of events: the 2008 recession, the ever-endless ubiquitous-ness of the Internet, the consequent exponential amount of choice a consumer has with it, un-mediated, – and, I would add, un-curated – the severance of the creative class from the “bourgeoisie” that happened in France in the middle 19th century with the rise of the “avant-garde” and its disdain for the middle-class, that in fact were the ones BUYING the stuff. Though Timberg is clearly coming from the left, he intelligently does not let the left off the hook. For example, he argues that the rise of theory – structuralism, post-structuralism, and other movements branching from the...