A quick and dirty guide to (WordPress) hosting, domain names and even a hint of SSL. Part 1.

A quick and dirty guide to (WordPress) hosting, domain names and even a hint of SSL. Part 1.

We’ve noticed a lot of questions in freelancer communities concerning web hosting and domain name management. It makes perfect sense, since there’s such an overload of companies offering the services which also leads to a whole variety of ways to actually execute what you’re trying to do. Our focus will be centered on WordPress here, since this seems to be one of the most recurring questions: ‘How the hell do I get started with a WordPress website?’ In this post we’ll show you some of our favorite providers and in our second part we’ll give you a non-technical explanation on getting everything set-up. Hosting We’re not going to get into too many technical details about shared hosting, vps and the like. Let’s just agree that while starting out, you’ll probably be okay with the cheapest subscription a provider offers and you can scale up when you notice an uptick in traffic and requirements. Now there’s some things to keep in mind. If this isn’t a completely new website (f.e. a redesign or a migration) or if you already have an existing mailing list that will guarantee you traffic, it may be better for you to skip the cheapest program or certain hosts from the start. Your best bet here is to ask any necessary questions through a hosts live chat function (they all have it nowadays) as this will give you a pretty good idea of the quality of their customer service and noob friendly-ness. Tell them your (expected) traffic and whether you’ll be doing anything particularly bandwidth-heavy (full screen photographic background portfolios come to mind). Who to choose? There’s been...
Kanye and Star Trek increased my Twitter interactions by 600%

Kanye and Star Trek increased my Twitter interactions by 600%

To get some traffic for our launch event I decided to experiment with ads on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Reddit. AdWords didn’t seem like a good fit at the moment because push marketing feels a bit counterintuitive for the product in question. Google Keyword Planner shows that “freelancer marketing decals” or “marketing for freelancers” just doesn’t get searched all that often. I might experiment with it later on though. For these ads I wasn’t focusing too much on incredible optimization and segmentation, this kind of stuff could be improved later on. I just wanted to get things underway and see if people enjoyed seeing these things pop up in their news feeds. Targeting always focused on freelancers in specific countries. This means that on Facebook I’d aim for people that ‘liked’ the bigger online freelancing websites. On Twitter I’d target people that followed the big freelancing accounts and on LinkedIn I’d focus on people that have the word ‘freelance’ in their job title. Facebook Nothing special happened on Facebook. Low interaction rates (compared to other campaigns I’ve ran) and not really worth the CPC in my opinion. They could definitely be improved but I think it’s probably not worth the time investment at this point. LinkedIn LinkedIn was expensive as hell! I had read that their prices were very inflated since they have such specific targeting options and are of course a B2B platform but still, €5 CPC was a bit over the top in my opinion. I assume it can work for companies selling $20k ERP solutions but it’s definitely not a good fit for my $35 stickers!    ...
Don’t bite the hand that feeds you. How to avoid client drama and bad breakups.

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you. How to avoid client drama and bad breakups.

Business relations have a tendency to be compared to any other kind of relationship but that couldn’t be further from the truth. The parallel pretty much stops at the fact that you’ll be interacting a lot with the same person. That’s it. Everything else is different, beginning from the way you interact up to the way you start and end the relationship. Let’s go over some key points to keep in mind when dealing with clients on a day-to-day basis.  1) Make sure you’re on the same page regarding the result. We’ve all heard the phrase “I know what I like when I see it”. See, that’s probably the worst way to start a business relation. Both parties want to jump-start the project and get things underway. A client may give you a vague description and some typical buzzwords like modern, hip, techy, minimal or retro. What you should always keep in mind is that these words may hold completely different meanings to you than to the client. Even more so if you’re working online and you and your client are from different continents. There’s a very high chance that your first draft will result in a client reaction saying it isn’t really what they had in mind and whether you could try again. This in turn will result in possible frustration on your side since you thought you had a good understanding of their wants and needs. A workaround for this problem is asking for examples. Whether they’re asking for a design, written content or photography, ask them to show you things they like and what the end...